Selected Cases

Since the 1970s, Lambda Legal has made history through winning legal victories that allowed LGBT people and people with HIV to live their lives with greater dignity, safety and equality under the law.

The cases below offer a broad overview of legal matters Lambda Legal has pursued on behalf of LGBT people and people living with HIV during the most recent decades of our nearly 40-year history.

Case arguing for the rights of a non-biological parent to receive primary custody of a child if biological parent is unfit
Case seeking the right for a lesbian woman to adopt her second child
Case in which a counseling student sues her school for requiring a remediation plan that included greater exposure to LGBT patients.
(Amicus) Case seeking the right for same-sex couples to marry in Connecticut
Lambda Legal filed a friend-of-the-court brief on behalf of nine national HIV advocacy organizations in King v. Burwell, the latest challenge to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The brief focuses on the disparate impact that an adverse decision will have on people of color living with HIV in the states that have elected not to run their own health insurance exchange.
Case arguing to uphold domestic partnership laws despite Proposition 22, California's antigay marriage initiative
Case in California arguing that businesses that extend benefits to married couples must also extend them on an equal basis to registered domestic partners
Appeal of a trial court order taking a thriving one-year-old girl away from her lesbian foster parents because the trial judge preferred the adoption placement to be with a "traditional family."
Case representing a transgender girl subjected to verbal and physical abuse because of her sexual orientation, gender identity, sex and disability while in the custody of a secure youth detention facility in Philadelphia.
Case challenging a hospital's decision to keep a lesbian from visiting her dying partner.
Case on behalf of a transgender man discriminated against by his federal employer because it denied health care coverage.


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